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As many families prepare to celebrate Easter on April 17, it’s important to keep in mind that this spring break can present potential dangers for our four-legged family members. According to the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center (APCC), please note the four most common Easter dangers before hiding those Easter eggs and putting up decorations.

Chocolate

The APCC gets several calls every day about pets eating chocolate, but most of these shows happen around four holidays: Halloween, Christmas, Valentine’s Day and Easter. Chocolate can cause gastrointestinal upset, pancreatitis, stimulation of the nervous system (hyperactivity, tremors and convulsions) and increased heart rate. Not all chocolates are created equal – the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is for pets. Other ingredients to keep out of your pet’s reach include raisins, macadamia nuts, xylitol, and alcohol.

plastic grass

Pets cannot absorb plastic Easter grass into their bodies, which means it can lodge in the gastrointestinal tract and wreak havoc if consumed. Signs of concern include vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite, lethargy, and stomach pain.

Plants

Many plants can cause problems for pets, but during this time of year, the APCC sees an increase in calls about spring-blooming lilies and bulbs. Lilies (Lilium sp. and Hemerocallis sp.) can cause serious problems for our feline friends. Exposure to any part of the plant can lead to kidney damage and gastrointestinal upset.

Fertilizers and herbicides

Many people start gardening and yard work on Easter weekend, including the use of fertilizers and herbicides. Make sure they are stored where animals cannot chew on or puncture the bottle and keep animals indoors while applying the products. Always follow label directions and wait to let your pet out until the product has been watered in or the soil is dry.

TAPCC is an incredible resource for any animal poison emergency – 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic or harmful substance, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Poison Control Center immediately at (888) 426-4435.

The Humane Society of Imperial County team hopes you and your four-legged family have a safe and happy Easter!

Devon Apodaca is the executive director of the Humane Society of Imperial County.

As many families prepare to celebrate Easter on April 17, it’s important to keep in mind that this spring break can present potential dangers for our four-legged family members. According to the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center (APCC), please note the top four most common Easter dangers before hiding those Easter eggs and putting up decorations.

“Chocolate – The APCC receives several calls each day about pets eating chocolate, but most of these exposures occur around four holidays: Halloween, Christmas, Valentine’s Day and Easter. Chocolate can cause gastrointestinal upset, pancreatitis, stimulation of the nervous system (hyperactivity, tremors and convulsions) and increased heart rate. Not all chocolates are created equal: the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is for pets. Other ingredients to keep out of your pet’s reach include raisins, macadamia nuts, xylitol, and alcohol.

plastic easter grass – Pets cannot absorb plastic Easter grass into their bodies, which means it can lodge in the gastrointestinal tract and wreak havoc if consumed. Signs of concern include vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite, lethargy, and stomach pain.

Plants – Many plants can cause trouble for pets, but during this time of year, the APCC sees an increase in calls about lilies and spring-blooming bulbs. Lilies (Lilium sp. and Hemerocallis sp.) can cause serious problems for our feline friends. Exposure to any part of the plant can lead to kidney damage and gastrointestinal upset.

Fertilizers and Herbicides – Many people start gardening and yard work on Easter weekend, including the use of fertilizers and herbicides. Make sure they are stored where animals cannot chew on or puncture the bottle and keep animals indoors while applying the products. Always follow label directions and wait to let your pet out until the product has been watered in or the soil is dry.

The APCC is an incredible resource for any animal poison emergency – twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic or harmful substance, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Poison Control Center immediately at 1-888-426-4435.

The Humane Society of Imperial County team hopes you and your four-legged family have a safe and happy Easter!

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